People line up with plastic bottles at a water distribution center in central Kyiv, after Russia's strikes left water outages across the city.


Russia launched a fresh round of missile strikes across Ukraine on Monday, leaving many residents in Kyiv without access to water and electricity.

As Ukrainians prepare for a harsh winter ahead, CNN’s team on the ground spoke to residents in the capital about how they are coping after eight grueling months of war.

Halashan Viktor, 70, lives on the fifth floor of an apartment block, where intense shelling disrupted water access.

“Not having water is fine, we can handle this. (The) main idea (is) that our troops will get us closer to victory soon,” he said.

Viktor said he was “really worried” about shelling during the first weeks of Russia’s invasion in February and March.

“I was (a) bit concerned during (the) first days of war, but my military service … got me stronger.

“(I) was really worried about my kids and shelling during (the) first month, but now I’m okay,” he added.

Halashan Viktor hopes Ukraine's military

Oleksandr Nechepuriak, a local office worker, said that it was the first time that the water had run out recently, adding “it’s a bit concerning for us, cause we need to get (the) office running.”

Another resident, Yana Lysenko, said her Monday morning “started horribly” after her water stopped following Russia’s attacks.

“I have a 4-year-old child, so of course I feel stressed,” the 31-year-old mother said.

“We don’t have water right now, but we do have electricity. We hope that the services will restore everything very quickly.

“Such terrorist actions targeting water and electricity supply, I believe, do not scare people anymore,” Lysenko added.

Quoted from Various Sources

Published for: Mr Blow Up