Christmas trees may cost a little more this holiday season.”The kids like to come out and get the real Christmas tree,” said Jill Painter.She said it has become a family tradition.”We started this tradition eight years ago when we first got married,” Painter said.While they’ve got a good idea of what they want, ideas for trees will vary this year.”Although I have a few different opinions now,” she said.While searching for the perfect tree in between a game of hide and seek, they’ll also be checking the price tags.Area tree farms said that because of the drought and inflation, most trees will be about 20% higher this year.For holiday tree buyers like Maggie Hudson’s family, they said they understand it might cost a little more.The farm said it takes eight years to grow a holiday tree. They are hoping by this time next year, their expenses like freight and kerosene will be down.”We’ll keep our fingers crossed. The freight was just incredible this year,” said Lyn Walther, of Strawberry Hill Christmas Tree Farm.The family at Strawberry Hill has been selling trees for four decades and said they usually sell out by the second week of December. “The response of people that have come this year, they’re happy and we are, too,” Walther said.

Christmas trees may cost a little more this holiday season.

“The kids like to come out and get the real Christmas tree,” said Jill Painter.

She said it has become a family tradition.

“We started this tradition eight years ago when we first got married,” Painter said.

While they’ve got a good idea of what they want, ideas for trees will vary this year.

“Although I have a few different opinions now,” she said.

While searching for the perfect tree in between a game of hide and seek, they’ll also be checking the price tags.

Area tree farms said that because of the drought and inflation, most trees will be about 20% higher this year.

For holiday tree buyers like Maggie Hudson’s family, they said they understand it might cost a little more.

The farm said it takes eight years to grow a holiday tree. They are hoping by this time next year, their expenses like freight and kerosene will be down.

“We’ll keep our fingers crossed. The freight was just incredible this year,” said Lyn Walther, of Strawberry Hill Christmas Tree Farm.

The family at Strawberry Hill has been selling trees for four decades and said they usually sell out by the second week of December.

“The response of people that have come this year, they’re happy and we are, too,” Walther said.

Quoted from Various Sources

Published for: Mr Blow Up