With too many buildings and not enough students to fill them, Kansas City Public Schools administrators are considering a plan to close 10 of the district’s schools.The idea behind the Blueprint 2030 plan would be to consolidate resources to give students a better academic and extracurricular experience.The plan would be done in phases over the course of the next several years with two high schools and eight elementary schools closing.”There’s a lot of discomfort in this, and I think it’s discomfort for all parts of the community, even as administrators. This is challenging for us to do,” said Dr. Jennifer Collier, interim KCPS superintendent.One of the first schools scheduled to close under the plan is Central High School. Rebuilt in the 1990s, Central’s building has enough space for 1,200 students. However, currently there are about 400 students enrolled there.Under the proposal, Central would close at the end of the school year. Remaining students would then attend Southeast High School.”I think that is very horrible,” said Da-Nearle Clarke, Central Class of 2011.The Eagles football team is scheduled to play its homecoming game in what could be the team’s last season.”It would be it’d be a tragedy. The Kansas City Chiefs helped build the football field,” said John Robinson, Central Class of 1976.”It’s going to be a tough one. But I don’t want to see this school closed no more than anybody else,” said Pat Clarke, Oak Park Neighborhood Association president.Central has a long history in Kansas City.The school opened in 1884 at 11th and Locust.Construction started at Central’s current location at Linwood and Indiana in 1912.The third and current building at that location was built in the 1990s.Central’s website boasts of “a large, one-acre field house, Greek-style theatre, an Olympic-sized swimming pool and state-of-the-art classrooms.”Additionally, Central’s alumni include Olympic sprinter Muna Lee, baseball Hall-of-Famer Casey Stengel and the legendary Walt Disney.”Yes, Central is a school that is rich in history and tradition. And I’m sure that was disheartening for those who are part of that community and those who are alumni,” Collier said.She also said KCPS consultants said even though Central’s building is one of the newer ones in the school system’s aging inventory, there are some major infrastructure concerns with Central.But Robinson opposes the plan to close the school.”This should be the jewel of the school system right here,” he said.Community input is part of the Blueprint 2030 process.The first time the public will have an opportunity to express opinions will be Monday at Southeast Community Center, 3400 East 63rd Street in Kansas City.The KCPS School Board is expected to make a final decision on Blueprint 2030 in December.

With too many buildings and not enough students to fill them, Kansas City Public Schools administrators are considering a plan to close 10 of the district’s schools.

The idea behind the Blueprint 2030 plan would be to consolidate resources to give students a better academic and extracurricular experience.

The plan would be done in phases over the course of the next several years with two high schools and eight elementary schools closing.

“There’s a lot of discomfort in this, and I think it’s discomfort for all parts of the community, even as administrators. This is challenging for us to do,” said Dr. Jennifer Collier, interim KCPS superintendent.

One of the first schools scheduled to close under the plan is Central High School. Rebuilt in the 1990s, Central’s building has enough space for 1,200 students. However, currently there are about 400 students enrolled there.

Under the proposal, Central would close at the end of the school year. Remaining students would then attend Southeast High School.

“I think that is very horrible,” said Da-Nearle Clarke, Central Class of 2011.

The Eagles football team is scheduled to play its homecoming game in what could be the team’s last season.

“It would be it’d be a tragedy. The Kansas City Chiefs helped build the football field,” said John Robinson, Central Class of 1976.

“It’s going to be a tough one. But I don’t want to see this school closed no more than anybody else,” said Pat Clarke, Oak Park Neighborhood Association president.

Central has a long history in Kansas City.

The school opened in 1884 at 11th and Locust.

Construction started at Central’s current location at Linwood and Indiana in 1912.

The third and current building at that location was built in the 1990s.

Central’s website boasts of “a large, one-acre field house, Greek-style theatre, an Olympic-sized swimming pool and state-of-the-art classrooms.”

Additionally, Central’s alumni include Olympic sprinter Muna Lee, baseball Hall-of-Famer Casey Stengel and the legendary Walt Disney.

“Yes, Central is a school that is rich in history and tradition. And I’m sure that was disheartening for those who are part of that community and those who are alumni,” Collier said.

She also said KCPS consultants said even though Central’s building is one of the newer ones in the school system’s aging inventory, there are some major infrastructure concerns with Central.

But Robinson opposes the plan to close the school.

“This should be the jewel of the school system right here,” he said.

Community input is part of the Blueprint 2030 process.

The first time the public will have an opportunity to express opinions will be Monday at Southeast Community Center, 3400 East 63rd Street in Kansas City.

The KCPS School Board is expected to make a final decision on Blueprint 2030 in December.

Quoted from Various Sources

Published for: Mr Blow Up